Oktoberfest and apples!

It’s beginning to feel like FALL—festivals and events every weekend and pumpkins, apples and squash on the shelves. This week we focus on the delectable but humble apple and the seasonal Oktoberfest Brews.  Yep, the season is turning.

KNOW YOUR APPLESapplesil
There are over 7000 apple varieties that were grown as recently as the 1800’s. In the United States, a hearty 2,500 varieties can be found though only about 100 are grown for commercial purposes. With all those apples, it’s surprising that the Crabapple is the only native North American apple tree. Of the 100 apple varieties grown, 15 comprise 90% of total production: Red Delicious, Gala, Golden Delicious, Granny Smith, and Fuji lead the way. As the season progresses we look forward to more varieties including the Arkansas Black, Empire and Winesap.

Varieties currently at LHG include:
Jonathans (From Vesterbrook Farms, Certified Naturaly Grown)  A sweet apple that is perfect for snacking and does well baked.
Gala (from Blue Heron-Certified Organic) Sweet and Crisp, these are great for eating and good for pies, sauces and baking
Golden Supreme (From Schwartz Orchard) A moderately crisp apple that is juicy to very juicy. The flavor is sweet to mildly sweet.
Granny Smith (organic): These are among the tartest of common apples and very crisp. Granny Smiths are excellent for pies.

A quick recipe for Baked Apple Slices. Wonderful on top of pancakes, stuffed in French toast or layered on Serendipity’s Tahitian Vanilla or Cinnamon Ice Cream.

http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/baked-apple-slices

Oktoberfest Beers oktoberfest
Thanks Schlafly for this mini-history of Oktoberfest:
Märzen, or Oktoberfest, has its origins in Bavaria, most likely before the 16th century.  For public safety and brewing quality concerns, the Bavarian Brauordnung was decreed in 1539, stating that beer could only be brewed from September 29th (Saint Michael) to April 23rd (Saint George).  Over the summer months, beers were stored, or lagered, in caves and stone cellars.  The evolution of Oktoberfest came from the last brews of the year, in March (or Märzen), as these beers would be ready to drink for the Bavarian celebration, “Oktoberfest”.

AT LOCAL HARVEST GROCERY
Excel Brewing Company, Breese, IL
Shoal Creek Oktoberfest has a flavor that is of balanced malty smoothness, low hop bitterness and a soft dryness from a long maturation. Shoal Creek Oktoberfest has a white foamy head with a reddish body that will make your Autumn celebration special.”
Schlafly, St. Louis, MO
Schlafly’s “Oktoberfest is a traditional Bavarian Märzen with a toasty malt aroma and slight caramel taste.  This rich, amber lager is balanced by the use of German noble hops, while the lager yeast ferments cold and slow, creating a smooth, crisp beer.”
Santa Fe Brewing Company, Santa Fe, NM 
Though it is not necessary to drink this beer out of a mug that is larger than your head while dancing to polka music and wearing your lederhosen, you will find this lager’s unbridled festivity difficult to resist. This ode to Germany’s classic fall lagers is as clean, clear, and quaffable as any that has ever weighed down the table of a German Beer garden. The crisp maltiness of classic Munich malt compounded with the delicious notes of Bavarian hops gives this clean-finishing beer just the right flavor for the end of the summer.”
Summit, St Paul, MN  
Brewed in the classic Märzen style with Northern Brewer hops from Germany. Rich, toffee malt flavors up front with a clean hop finish as crisp as the autumn air.”
Boulevard Bobs 47, Kansas City, MO
“Bob’s ’47 Oktoberfest is a medium-bodied, dark amber brew with a malty flavor and well-balanced hop character. With this Munich-style lager Boulevard salutes Bob Werkowitch, Master Brewer and graduate of the U.S. Brewer’s Academy, 1947.”

CLASSES and EVENTS
Below please find our next two classes and events and a link to our website listing all of our classes and events.  To register for a class call 314.865.5260 or register in Local Harvest Grocery.   http://localharvestgrocery.com/lhg/classes/

Dyeing for Fun: A ReMake Happy Hour Presented by Perennial (perennial.org) October 3, 6:00-8:00p.m., $35.00 Location: LHC, 3137 Morgan Ford Road, 63116 Learn how to dye and print on fabric using natural materials you can find outside or inside your pantry! Participants will learn to naturally dye fabrics using turmeric, a yellow spice, and walnut hulls. Plus, you’ll explore simple techniques to print new designs and patterns with eco-friendly milk paint and a red wine concentrate, transforming old linens into handmade masterpieces. It’s culinary printing at its best! Leave with a set of handkerchiefs and enjoy some vino and snacks with your best pals.

Geisert Farms Dinner and Farm Tour October 4, 5-9p.m., $30.00 per person (Adults only) Location: Geisert Farms in Washington, MO (45 minute drive) This event promises to be super fun. Guests will get a guided hayride tour of Todd’s hog farm. Afterwards, dine on Todd’s “fine swine” accompanied by dishes from LHC and all enjoyed in the great outdoors with live music, a bonfire and local beer.  Todd is excited to give tours of the farm and showcase his family’s commitment to sustainable hog farming.  (RAIN DATE, Oct. 5, 4-8 p.m)

 

 

 

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Know your EGGS!

KNOW YOUR EGGSeggsphoto

Of all the local products that we carry at Local Harvest Grocery, we get the most questions about our eggs. Eggs are an easy source of protein, easy to cook and you can get a lot of meals from one dozen. Eggs are also a great way to start incorporating local into your diet.  We carry eggs from 6 different farms including DUCK eggs. Below is a summary that will keep you in the know.  As you will see, all of our eggs are local and raised on pasture.

*We use all local eggs at LHC and in all of the baked goods from LHC that are for sale at Local Harvest Grocery. At LHC you’ll enjoy eggs from Dry Dock Farms and Three Spring Farm.  Both farms raise their chickens on the land and use non-medicated feed and forage. 

Farm Farm location What the chickens eat? How they are raised Cost per dozen
Live Springs Farm Carrolton, IL Bobbi and Alex grow their own non-GMO spelt, wheat and barley and then add locally grown non-gmo corn and whole roasted soybeans to create their feed mix. The chickens live outside and have egg mobiles with roosts and nesting boxes. They keep 700 on an acre or so and they are moved  every other day. Bobbi says that by moving them more often you stimulate the chickens to forage more and rely less on feed. $6.99
Old Homestead Washington, MO Non-antibiotic feed and forage. Fran also loves to feed her chickens fresh greens Live outside in a very large fenced area that is rotated periodically. Chickens have nesting areas in moveable tractors. $4.99
Martin Family Farms Vandalia, MO Non-GMO feed that the Martins mix themselves with locally grown non-GMO grains They raise 1000 chickens on 15 acres. The chickens come inside at night to lay and roost. $4.69
Ben Roberts Smithton, MO Non-GMO feed and forage Raised by Farmer Tim. They spend most of their time outdoors. $4.99
Mose Miller Prairie Home, MO Non-medicated feed and forage Chickens are raised on pasture by this small family farm outside of Columbia, MO $3.99
Amos Slabaugh Prairie Home, MO Non-medicated feed and forage Pasture-raised ducks. $8.99

Eggs for Dinner

This is a great link with 19 ways to make eggs for dinner.

http://www.babble.com/best-recipes/19-unique-baked-egg-recipes-hearty-enough-for-dinner/

Chicken facts

  1. The breed of chicken determines the egg color.
  2. The chicken is thought to be the closest living relative to the T-Rex. ROAR.

Easy to peel hard-boiled eggs

The only downside to delicious fresh eggs is that they are harder to peel if you want hardboiled eggs. Try these tips and let your egg-peeling dreams come true.

    1. Fill a pan with water. Water should be about an inch over the tops of the eggs (but don’t add eggs just yet)
    2. Add ½ tsp salt to water
    3. Add 1 TBLS white vinegar to water
    4. Bring water to a near boil.
    5. Place eggs gently to nearly boiling water and bring to a low boil for 15 minutes.
    6. Run cold water over for four minutes or plunge in ice water and let sit for 4 minutes.
    7. Crack in cold water and let sit in the cold water while you peel the eggs.

150 Mile Club News
September 17 is Member Shopping Day. Members of the 150 Mile Club enjoy 10% off their entire purchase (except alcohol). It’s free to join the club. Membership helps us track where our customers live, customer preferences and allows us to thank our shoppers with member shopping days, gift cards for top shoppers and periodic fun giveaways.

KNOW YOUR ARTISAN BREWERY
Perennial Artisan Ales
We remember meeting Phil and Emily Wymore when they first visited Local Harvest Grocery and excitedly talked about the new brewery they were starting. Newly relocated back to Missouri from Chicago, they were eager to incorporate local ingredients into upcoming brews. A quick perusal of their current and past offerings indicates their dedication to local flavors and sourcing. Perennial Artisan Ales quickly made a name for themselves among beer connoisseurs.  Perennial beers tend more to the sour and wild yeasts and have created buying frenzy for some releases like the Barrel-Aged Abraxas.

Currently at Local Harvest
Saison de Lis  A Belgian-Style Saison brewed with Chamomile Flowers. Perennial’s description: “It is fermented with a traditional saison yeast strain that imparts fruity and spicy notes that dovetail perfectly with the tea-like quality of the chamomile. Finishes dry, tart, and refreshing. “

Peach Berliner Weisse  A German-style tart beer made new by brewing with 750 pounds of Missouri and southern Illinois peaches. This beer appeals to beer connoisseurs and wine drinkers and is a perfect choice for summer.

The Last Word  Perennial’s first Cocktail-inspired craft beer in their new series, Dealer’s Choice.  Perennial describes their first installment in the series as “a tart golden ale brewed with key lime and herbs. The Last Word is a nod to an illicit Prohibition-era tipple of the same name. Citrus and bright lactic acidity lead a pungent herbal character, all atop a subtle underlying malt sweetness.” The Last Word was brewed in collaboration with The Aviary in Chicago.

Read more about Perennial Artisan Ales in this month’s edition of Feast. http://www.feastmagazine.com/dine-out/features/article_16f598b6-2dfa-11e4-8199-0017a43b2370.html

CLASSES
Below please find our next two classes and a link to our website listing all of our classes and events.  To register for a class call 314.865.5260 or register in Local Harvest Grocery. 
 
We’ve added even more classes including a mushroom hunt and a class on Entomophagy—The practice of eating bugs. Check our website link for more information. http://localharvestgrocery.com/lhg/classes/

 
DIY Kim Chi and Sauerkraut Presented by Jenny Bangert of Bamboo Studios September 18, 2014, 6-7:30, $20.00 Location: LHC, 3137 Morgan Ford Road, 63116 Curious about fermentation? Wondering how you can make it yourself? It’s pretty easy and delicious. Come learn with us. Jenny will let you in on why you should add fermented foods into your diet.  You’ll leave with your own jar of kim chi.

Fall Mushroom Hunt
Presented by T.R. Davis of Earth Angel Mushrooms
September 20, 9-1:00, $40 (includes lunch and cultivated mushrooms from Earth Angel)
Location: Rockwood Reservation
T.R. will take you a vigorous hike in search of Lion’s Mane, Chicken of the Woods and Hen of the Woods mushrooms.  Wear sturdy shoes and be prepared for 2-3 hours of trouncing through Rockwood reservation in search of these tasty, Missouri mushrooms. Afterwards, enjoy a meal prepared by LHC at a nearby picnic area and take home some cultivated mushrooms from Earth Angel Farms.

 

 

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Mozzarella, Perennial Artisal Ale and classes

KNOW YOUR ARTISAN BREWERY
Perennial Artisan Ales
We remember meeting Phil and Emily Wymore when they first visited Local Harvest Grocery and excitedly talked about the new brewery they were starting. Newly relocated back to Missouri from Chicago, they were eager to incorporate local ingredients into upcoming brews. A quick perusal of their current and past offerings indicates their dedication to local flavors and sourcing.  Perennial Artisan Ales quickly made a name for themselves among beer connoisseurs.  Perennial beers tend more to the sour and wild yeasts and have created buying frenzy for some releases like the Barrel-Aged Abraxas.
Currently at Local Harvest perennial
Saison de Lis  A Belgian-Style Saison brewed with Chamomile Flowers. Perennial’s description: “It is fermented with a traditional saison yeast strain that imparts fruity and spicy notes that dovetail perfectly with the tea-like quality of the chamomile. Finishes dry, tart, and refreshing. “
Peach Berliner Weisse  A German-style tart beer made new by brewing with 750 pounds of Missouri and southern Illinois peaches. This beer appeals to beer connoisseurs and wine drinkers and is a perfect choice for summer.
The Last Word  Perennial’s first Cocktail-inspired craft beer in their new series, Dealer’s Choice.  Perennial describes their first installment in the series as “a tart golden ale brewed with key lime and herbs.  The Last Word is a nod to an illicit Prohibition-era tipple of the same name. Citrus and bright lactic acidity lead a pungent herbal character, all atop a subtle underlying malt sweetness.” The Last Word was brewed in collaboration with The Aviary in Chicago.

Read more about Perennial Artisan Ales in this month’s edition of Feast. http://www.feastmagazine.com/dine-out/features/article_16f598b6-2dfa-11e4-8199-0017a43b2370.html

 
KNOW YOUR CHEESE
Fresh Mozzarella from Marcoot Creamery (Greeneville, IL)
We were reluctant to talk about Marcoot’s Fresh Mozzarella because it is already hard enough to keep in stock.  But, with summertime waning and fresh summer veggies still in abundance, we could not resist. Marcoot’s Fresh Mozz is the perfect sponginess and amazing in salads, on flatbreads, and sliced and drizzled with your favorite balsamic and chopped basil and tomatoes.

UNCOMMON PRODUCE husk cherries
Husk Cherries, aka ground cherries, are a “don’t miss” with a very short season. Ask for a sample if you’ve never tried one. They grow in a skin like a tomatillo and the sweet and firm flesh has notes of pineapple. Eat alone, bake into a tart, or lightly sauté to bring out a warmer flavor.

PRODUCE NOTES
Gala, Jonathan and Golden Supreme are the first of the local apples to arrive from Illinois.  Dan of Blue Heron Organic Orchard says the weather has been perfect for apple growth and believes that the milder summer weather has encouraged richer colors in the apple skins.   His Arkansas Black varietal this year is sporting a color that is true to its name—a deep burgundy color, bordering on velvety black.  We can’t wait to sink our teeth into it when they are fully ripe.

Grilled Zucchini Salad with Mozzarella
Ingredients
3 medium zucchini sliced lengthwise into 1/4-inch planks
3T extra virgin olive oil
Salt and ground black pepper
8 ounce fresh mozzarella ball, pulled into large pieces
2 T coarsely snipped fresh basil
1/4 tsp crushed red pepper
1 T lemon juice

Directions

On a baking sheet arrange zucchini in a single layer. Drizzle with 1T of the olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper.

  • For a charcoal grill, grill zucchini directly over medium coals about 8 minutes or until tender, turning once. (For a gas grill, preheat grill and reduce heat. Place zucchini on grill rack over heat. Cover and grill as directed.)
  • On a serving platter arrange warm zucchini and mozzarella. Sprinkle with chopped fresh herbs and crushed red pepper. Drizzle with lemon juice and  remaining 2T olive oil.

CLASSES
Below please find our next two classes and a link to our website listing all of our classes and events.  To register for a class call 314.865.5260 or register in Local Harvest Grocery. 
We’ve added even more classes including a mushroom hunt and a class on Entomophagy—The practice of eating bugs. Check our website link for more information. http://localharvestgrocery.com/lhg/classes/
You can “Can It”!  A beginner canning class Presented by Annette Beach of Local Harvest September 11, 5-8 p.m., $60.00 Location: LHC, 3137 Morgan Ford Road, 63116 Just like grandma used to do…or you wish she did. Come and learn how to preserve the bounty of summer/fall in this beginning class on canning. Annette will cover safety, equipment and participants will leave with some canned jars of their very own.  Participants will get hands on experience.  The course will also provide recipes for holiday gift giving from your very own kitchen.

DIY Kim Chi and Sauerkraut Presented by Jenny Bangert of Bamboo Studios September 18, 2014, 6-7:30, $20.00 Location: LHC, 3137 Morgan Ford Road, 63116 Curious about fermentation? Wondering how you can make it yourself? It’s pretty easy and delicious. Come learn with us. Jenny will let you in on why you should add fermented foods into your diet.  You’ll leave with your own jar of kim chi.

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Grilling Turkey Legs, Watermelon Daquiri recipe and classes

GRILL IT

Buttonwood Farms Turkey Legs $1.49lb SALE
Grill something different this holiday weekend, delicious (Renaissance Fair worthy) and big turkey legs from Buttonwood Farms in California, MO. Matt raises his turkeys on pasture and provides natural feed as well as forage.

How to prepare

George (our meat buyer) suggests:
Thaw the turkey legs first. Dry the legs and cover them in a dry rub–“Captain Tony’s Wild Alaska Rub” is a great one. Let them sit for an hour in the fridge.
Get your fire ready during this time. Local Harvest Grocery sells Rockwood Charcoal and 200 Acre Wood Homestead smoker wood (both local products).  Grill the turkey legs over indirect heat for 60-90 minutes. Internal temp should be 180 degrees.
Here are a couple links for other info about grilling turkey legs including brining.
http://www.ehow.com/facts_7148070_grilled-turkey-legs.html

http://www.ehow.com/how_5759931_cook-turkey-legs-grill.html

KNOW YOUR SAUCE—BBQ sauce  bbq sauce
Uncle Joe’s from Ina, IL has a great Sweet Mustard BBQ sauce that’ll bring you a taste of the Carolina’s BBQ tradition. NO MSG, No Corn Syrup, just a nice mustard tang with a big bite of sweet.
Freddie Lee’s Ghetto Sauce, an “all purpose sauce”, is a staff favorite at LHG staff.  Great on BBQ and veggies and Freddie will tell you that it’s a perfect addition to your morning eggs.
And if it’s Sweet and Spicy you want, grab a jar of Millie’s Barbeque sauce for your ribs, burgers and even as the jar suggests, Fried Bologna!

SUMMERTIME RUM
Watermelon-Basil Daiquiri  rum
(makes 1 drink)

6-8 one-inch cubes of watermelon (for frozen daiquiri, freeze watermelon and process everything in the blender)
4-6  basil leaves (can substitute mint)
¼ cup dark aged or white rum (2 oz)
2 T lime juice (1 oz)
1 ½ T simple syrup (make your own http://www.ehow.com/how_2249375_make-simple-syrup.html or purchase at LHG)
Frozen watermelon spears for garnish
In a cocktail shaker combine watermelon and basil (or mint); muddle until watermelon is broken up and juiced. Add rum, lime juice, simple syrup and ice. Shake until chilled (about 40 seconds) Double-strain into an ice-filled glass and garnish with a frozen watermelon spear.

CLASSES
Below please find our next two classes and a link to our website listing all of our classes and events.  To register for a class call 314.865.5260 or register in Local Harvest Grocery. 
We’ve added even more classes including a class on Entomophagy—The practice of eating bugs. Check our website link for more information. http://localharvestgrocery.com/lhg/classes/

You can “Can It”!  A beginner canning class Presented by Annette Beach of Local Harvest September 11, 5-8 p.m., $60.00 Location: LHC, 3137 Morgan Ford Road, 63116 Just like grandma used to do…or you wish she did. Come and learn how to preserve the bounty of summer/fall in this beginning class on canning. Annette will cover safety, equipment and participants will leave with some canned jars of their very own.  Participants will get hands on experience.  The course will also provide recipes for holiday gift giving from your very own kitchen.

DIY Kim Chi and Sauerkraut Presented by Jenny Bangert of Bamboo Studios September 18, 2014, 6-7:30, $20.00 Location: LHC, 3137 Morgan Ford Road, 63116 Curious about fermentation? Wondering how you can make it yourself? It’s pretty easy and delicious. Come learn with us. Jenny will let you in on why you should add fermented foods into your diet.  You’ll leave with your own jar of kim chi.

 

 

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Sauvignon Blanc, Produce storage tips and simple cookie recipe

 

KNOW YOUR WINE
SAUVIGNON BLANC sauvignon
Sauvignon Blancs are the perfect wine for summer or as an aperitif. Sauvignon Blanc is most famous as the grape responsible for Sancerre and Pouilly-Fume, two of the most popular and energizing white wines of France.  Sauvignon Blancs are usually fermented in stainless steel tanks to retain the clean and bright qualities of this wine.  Some California producers (this grape grows well in California) have introduced oak barrels, but they remain less popular.

These wines are known for their grassy notes and New Zealanders often describe flavors of gooseberries which aren’t as well know in the U.S. Sauvignons are refreshing wines and a perfect wine to drink as we say goodbye to summer.

Food Pairing:
Perfect as an aperitif and with lighter dishes like salads, risottos, chicken and fish.

Sauvignons at Local Harvest:
Shannon Ridge, 2013 (Certified California Sustainable Vineyard) http://www.shannonridge.com/ranch/farming This California Sauvignon is a great buy at $10.69. Fermented in steel barrels, this wine is clear and crisp and will have you wishing that summer would last forever.
Hunky Dory, New Zealand This wine offers tropical fruit notes packed with lime and gooseberry flavors.  It has a full flavored lingering finish.  $15.49
Galan, Chile 2013  Smooth and crisp with notes of apple.  $9.69
Morgan 2012  This Monterrey, CA wine is comprised of a proprietary blend of classic Sauvignon Blanc, Sauvignon Musqué, Semillon, and Albarino. It has a 6 month visit to oak barrels for aging after fermentation in steel tanks.  The oak aging lightly accents the bright acidity and adds a creamier texture. $12.89
Casas del Bosque, Chile 2011 ReservaThis beautiful pale straw color wine has a crisp palate with nose of kiwi, pineapple and fresh cut grass.  $13.89

EASY VEGAN (can be GF and SugarFree) COOKIE
My Mother-in-Law recently visited and she and my father-in-law adopted a vegan diet a little over a year ago.  During her stay she made several batches of these cookies and we gobbled them up. These could be Gluten-Free by using GF-oats. Great way to use up all those ripe bananas.

Sweet and Simple Cookies
3 mashed ripe bananas
1/3 c. applesauce (Santa Cruz Organic is great)
2 c. oats
¼ c. almond milk
2 tsp sugar or 1 pkt. Stevia (small packets)
½ cup raisins or chocolate chips (Enjoy Life are semi-sweet and dairy, nut and soy free)
1 tsp. vanilla
1 tsp. cinnamon
Mix all together and spoon out onto a lightly oiled cookie sheet. Bake at 350 degrees for 25-30 min. Makes about 18.

PRODUCE STORAGE TIPS             
Storing your produce properly will help you keep food waste to a minimum. Here are some tips compiled by Becca, our Weekly Harvest Coordinator.

Beets don’t rinse until ready to eat, remove greens (they’re edible!) and store them separately bags in fridge greens 2-3 days, roots 2-3 weeks
Bell Peppers and other peppers don’t rinse until ready to eat, storing wet reduces shelf life loose in fridge (will keep on counter for a few days) 4-5 days
Blueberries don’t rinse until ready to eat, rinsing removes a natural preservative “bloom” in container in fridge 1 week
Cabbage don’t rinse until ready to eat, don’t store wet wrapped in plastic or tightly sealed container, keep partially used cabbage tightly wrapped 1-2 weeks
Cantaloupe don’t rinse until ready to eat in pantry if under ripe, fridge once ripe 1 week in fridge
Carrots with tops remove greens, rinse before using in plastic bag or container in fridge up to 3 weeks
Cherry Tomatoes don’t rinse until ready to eat on counter, no bags, refrigerating compromises taste and texture 3-5 days
Cucumber don’t rinse until ready to eat, don’t store wet can be left out on counter for a few days, otherwise refrigerate for longer life 3-4 days on counter, 4-5 in fridge
Kale rinse and remove any ties or rubber bands before storing in a bag in crisper drawer of fridge 1-2 weeks
Garlic no rinsing room temperature, keep cool and dry in pantry whole heads up to 5 months, loose unpeeled cloves 7-10 days
Green Beans rinse before using, don’t store wet in container or bag in fridge 3-5 days
Heirloom Tomatoes don’t rinse until ready to eat on counter, no bags, refrigerating compromises taste and texture 3-5 days
Leeks don’t rinse until ready to eat, when ready to clean cut in half lengthwise and soak to remove debris between layers in plastic bag in fridge 5-7 days
Onions don’t peel or rinse until ready to use in cool pantry or fridge, don’t store near potatoes- they’ll both spoil faster 2-3 months
Organic Slicing Tomatoes don’t rinse until ready to eat on counter, no bags, refrigerating compromises taste and texture 3-5 days
Potatoes don’t scrub or rinse until ready to eat, don’t store wet room temperature for shorter storage, root cellar or basement (45-55 deg) for longer, refrigeration is not recommended. Don’t’ store near onions- they’ll both spoil faster 1-2 weeks room temperature, 2-3 months basement
Sweet Banana Peppers don’t rinse until ready to eat, storing wet reduces shelf life loose in fridge 4-5 days
Zucchini don’t rinse until ready to eat on counter or pantry, does not need to be refrigerated but can be for longer life 5-7 days

 

 

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School lunches, pork shop, saisons

150 Mile Club Shopping Day is AUGUST 20th. Members of our in-house shopper

Join the Club!

Join the Club!

loyalty program, the 150 Mile Club receive 10% off their purchase on August 20th. (Does not include alcohol).

Salume Beddu Pork Shop Dinner at LHC 
September 1, 2014 7: 00 p.m. 014 at 7:00 PM
Enjoy a delicious nose to tail dinner expertly prepared by the artisans of Salume Beddu. The meal features locally raised heritage breed pork from Live Springs Farm, and optional wine pairings from
Parker’s Table, served in a communal setting at LHC (Local Harvest Café)
$50 per person
$80 with wine pairings
Reservations required and made through Salume Beddu 314.353.3100

SCHOOL LUNCHES (or grown-up lunches)
I’ll admit to dreading making my son’s lunch a time or two (or twenty). He’s seven and although he will eat his veggies, (mostly) it can be challenging to come up with ideas for lunch. Figuring that many other parents have this same issue, here are some quick and easy lunch box ideas and a product guide to items in Local Harvest Grocery.

• Egg Salad (easy, protein packed and can be made into a wrap, served with crackers or on bread) made with local eggs. We carry Companion Bread, Breadsmith and Great Harvest Bread which are all great for sandwiches.
• Ham and Cheese Wrap featuring Geisert Ham, Praire Breeze Cheese and Garden of Eatin’ Tortillas. Add a handful of Claverach pea shoots instead of lettuce for crunch and nutrition.
Hummus (from LHC), carrot and celery sticks or even cherry tomatoes. Add a hardboiled egg, an apple or watermelon slice and a handful of tamari almonds (in our bulk section) and you have a great lunch for kids or grown-ups.
• PB and J…use LHG, fresh-ground organic peanut butter (no added sugar or salt) or Mound City Almond Butter and serve with local honey or favorite Centennial Farms or Hilty’s Jam.
• Berry or Peanut Butter and Banana smoothie. A smoothie with yogurt, nut milk or nut butters and your favorite fruits can be a filling and satisfying part of your child’s lunch. Include a piece of fruit, some carrot sticks, or maybe even some crackers. Local Windcrest Dairy Greek Yogurt adds a nice thickness.
• Cottage cheese with fruit or veggies, crackers, a side of veggies and/or fruit along with some toasted sunflower seeds. Nancy’s Cottage Cheese is our cottage cheese of choice.
Organic Valley Cream Cheese and honey wrap with sliced bananas. (Just be sure to wrap it well. The honey can be hard to contain in the wrap.)
• Cold pasta. That’s right. If your child likes pasta salads or spaghetti and sauce, it’s fine to eat cold and an easy way to use leftovers. For adventurous eaters, make a peanut sauce with tamari and ginger and toss with broccoli and pasta.
• Use leftover roasted Buttonwood chicken to make chicken salad or buy our house-made smoked chicken salad.

Easy Meats at Local Harvest meat
Geisert Ham Slices (Todd Geisert Farms is located in Washington, MO)
Geisert Ham or Summer Sausage (great sliced with cheese and served with crackers)
Geisert Bologna
Applegate Farms Roasted Turkey or Ham
Beef or bison jerky or snack sticks from local beef producers
Sandwich/Cracker Cheeses for kids
Rumiano non-GMO cheeses (available sliced or in 8oz pieces)
Milton Creamery Colby, Cheddar or Prairie Breeze for a stronger flavor
Marcoot Creamery White Cheddar (Greeneville, IL)
Quick Veggies and fruit
Steam or sauté extra veggies a couple of times a week so you have servings for all week.
Stahlbush organic peas, corn, mixed veggies or frozen blueberries are great to keep in the freezer and use for a quick veggie or fruit side.
Late summer is a great time to keep chunks of watermelon and cantaloupe handy. Package and send
with your child.
Snacks
We’ve packaged up plenty of new goodies for kids and grownups that make a wonderful small treat for lunch or snack after school. Chocolate and yogurt covered pretzels, chocolate covered almonds, apple rings, Midwest and Backwood Trail mix and plenty more. And of course Snyder’s Gluten-Free pretzels with their very crisp crunch and perfect salt mix are good for all.

KNOW YOUR BEERsaison
SAISONS
Saison (the French word for Season) beers were originally brewed in farmhouses in the French speaking regions of Belgium for field workers. Saisons were typically brewed during the cooler, less active months and then stored until the next harvest. Brewing in the winter provided farmers with work during an otherwise slow time of year. Also, spent grain from brew days was used for animal feed providing livestock with nutrients when grain was in low supply. Brewing was beneficial to multiple aspects of farm life.

Saisons are a light and refreshing ale with a complex style from the mix of fruity aroma and flavor, some spiciness and even a hint of tartness. Saisons are based on a Pilsner malt and usually have more hops than other Belgium styles. The ale yeast contributes loads of flavor complimented by the addition of herbs and spices.

Saisons were brewed to last through the season without becoming infected. Saison were brewed to have a dry flavor profile and hops and spices were usually added for their bacteriostatic properties. Because they were not brewed in aseptic environments, multistrain fermentations took place giving the beer a wild flavor and adding to its complexity. Each farmhouse had their own recipe, brewing technique and microflora so beers were vastly different from farm to farm.

Alcohol content: 5-8% abv

Food Pairing: Can be overbearing for delicate foods, but can really enhance the flavors of a hot and spicy dish, sausage and even a simple BBQ pork.

Saisons at Local Harvest
Boulevard Tank 7
Foret Organic Saison
Stillwater Cellar Door and Stateside Saison
Fantome Hiver and Printemps
Crooked Stave Surette Provision Saison and Vieille Artisinal Saison

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Salume Beddu and LHC Pork Shop Dinner

PORKSHOP

Two Day Butchery Course

& Nose to Tail Dinner with LHC

Sunday August 31st & Monday September 1st

Topics covered will include:
◾The importance of heritage breed hogs

◾Whole hog butchery

◾Basic cure techniques

◾At home sausage making

PorkShop will end in a nose to tail dinner hosted by LHC (Local Harvest Café) with wine pairings by Parker’s Table. Each student may reserve one additional seat for the dinner at $35.

Space for the class is limited to 8 students. Cost for the event is $425 dollars and includes all course materials and Nose to Tail dinner. A $100 non-refundable deposit is required at the time of sign-up.

Folks can also sign up to attend the dinner only. $50 dinner and $30 wine pairing. Seating is limited, but it promises to be a fun evening. Reservations are required. Call or email Salume Beddue at number or email below.

Call Salume Beddu at 314.353.3100 or email us info@salumebeddu.com to reserve your spot today.

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Saisons, salsa and yes….laundry

saisonHello August and summer wind down time. We welcome the continued produce bounty that keeps pouring in from our local farms and hope you are enjoying it as well.
KNOW YOUR BEER
SAISONS

Saison (the French word for Season) beers were originally brewed in farmhouses in the French speaking regions of Belgium for field workers.  Saisons were typically brewed during the cooler, less active months and then stored until the next harvest.  Brewing in the winter provided farmers with work during an otherwise slow time of year. Also, spent grain from brew days was used for animal feed providing livestock with nutrients when grain was in low supply.  Brewing was beneficial to multiple aspects of farm life.
Saisons are a light and refreshing ale with a complex style from the mix of fruity aroma and flavor, some spiciness and even a hint of tartness. Saisons are based on a Pilsner malt and usually have more hops than other Belgium styles.  The ale yeast contributes loads of flavor complimented by the addition of herbs and spices.

Saisons were brewed to last through the season without becoming infected. Saison were brewed to have a dry flavor profile and hops and spices were usually added for their bacteriostatic properties.  Because they were not brewed in aseptic environments, multistrain fermentations took place giving the beer a wild flavor and adding to its complexity.  Each farmhouse had their own recipe, brewing technique and microflora so beers were vastly different from farm to farm.

Alcohol content: 5-8% abv

Food Pairing: Can be overbearing for delicate foods, but can really enhance the flavors of a hot and spicy dish, sausage and even a simple BBQ pork.

Saisons at Local Harvest

Boulevard Tank 7

Foret Organic Saison

Stillwater Cellar Door and Stateside Saison

Fantome Hiver and Printemps

Crooked Stave Surette Provision Saison and Vieille Artisinal Saison

 

SUMMER SALSA

Super simple Summer Salsa Recipe

Ingredients
5 tomatoes (your choice of tomato)  For this recipe, I leave the skins on, if you have an aversion to that you can remove the peels by putting in boiling water until the skins crack and then peeling off the skins.
½ cup of red or white onion
1-2 jalapeno peppers depending on your love of hot
½ bunch small cilantro (vary depending on your taste)
3 cloves garlic
Juice of 1 lime
Salt to taste
Directions
Chunk all veggies and add to your food processor or even blender. Blend to your desired consistency. Sample and add more cilantro, jalapeno, or salt for your taste.  Store in the refrigerator.

 

LAUNDRY TIPS

We thought you all might appreciate these tips to extend the life of your clothes that we found mostly on Babble.com via the magazine The Week.  One involves a freezer and I admit I really want to try it.

#1 – Go easy on detergent.  Check the amount recommended and use less.  Detergents aren’t cheap and this is a great way to save money and keep your clothes in better shape. (Local Harvest carries wonderful local and sustainable laundry powders and liquids..including Better Life (local), Planet, BioKleen and Ecover)

#2 – Turn your clothes inside out.  Washing your clothes inside out will prevent fading and prevent damage.

#3 – Use the delicate cycle.  What? This one was surprising, but the “experts” advise that the gentle cycle is better for your clothes.

#4 – Never wash denim.  WHAT???  According to Babble.com, folks should “spot clean stains off your jeans and when you want to freshen them up, kill bacteria or remove stink, place your jeans in the freezer for a few days secure in a ziploc bag.”  Seriously, I would need a chest freezer for this, but I must say I am curious to try this.

#5 -  Line dry.  Obviously easier if you have some good outdoor space, but clothes will last longer without a tumble in the dryer.

#6-Wash in cold not hot.  This is an oldy, but a goody. Good for your clothes and heating costs.

 

CLASSES –Check out “CLASSES” tab for a list of our classes

 

 

 

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Inglorious/Glorious Produce and Kefir

KNOW YOUR Rosérose

Rosé wine is a type of wine that incorporates some of the color from the grape skins to alter the color, but not enough to qualify as a red wine. The “pink” color can range from a light orange to near purple depending on the variety of grape and technique of the wine maker. Typically the grape skins are in contact with the juice for 1-3 days and then removed. Skin contact is the primary method for producing rosé wine.
Rosé wines can be still, semi-sparkling, sparking and bone-dry to very sweet.
At Local Harvest Grocery:
Libalis Rose $4.99 SUPER SALE Floral, semi-sweet rose from La Rioja
La Closerie des Lys This French Rosé is made from a blend of Sirah, Grenache and Cinsault
Barrel 27 Shenanigans Made from a blend of Grenache, Syrah and Mourvedre This very floral rosé has a light strawberry flavor. Some tasters prefer this one served at room temp.
Sean Minor 4 Bears Pairs well with lighter fare such as salads, mushroom dishes, or sipped on its own. On the palette it has a nice strawberry note.

INGLORIOUS/GLORIOUS PRODUCE

Fun video about France’s efforts to reduce food waste and educate about what food really looks like. Visit our Glorious/inglorious produce!  We celebrate the big fat heirlooms, the slightly bumply apple, the eggplant with an extra protrusion. Check out our reduced price produce area for our take on inglorious.

KNOW YOUR FERMENTED BEVERAGESkefir

KEFIR
This yogurt-like drink which is pronounced keh-feer (although I like to say it key-fur which I guess is not correct) has become a popular choice for folks interested in increasing the health of their “gut” and who like a little bit of sour in their life.  We’ve been making our own Kefir at LHC and demand keeps growing for it.  Kefir grains are actually living colonies of friendly microbes that will ferment cane sugar or milk sugar into a nutrient packed drink with a similar consistency to pourable yogurt.  Kefir can be made using diary milk, but can also be made with other “milks” like almond or coconut. For a vegan treat or for those who prefer the non-dairy approach, our coconut kefir is a fantastic alternative with a very tropical flavor.
Use kefir in place of yogurt in smoothies, pour over your morning granola or oatmeal or drink a bit each day.  This cultured probiotic filled drink is packed with folic acid, living bacteria, biotin, vitamins K and B and is often used by folks who want to increase healthy bacteria in their bodies.  Many customers seek it out after a course of antibiotics or to help with conditions like Crohn’s or IBS.
Learn to make your own milk or water kefir at our class on August 26, 6 p.m. (See Class info below)

CLASSES

HOW TO REGISTER Sign up in our store or call 865.5260 to register. Payment must be made at time of registration for all classes with a fee.
Seed Saving Basics Presented by Becca Widzer of Local Harvest and Weekly Harvest August 23, 2014 10-11 a.m. FREE (no need to register for this class) Location: Tower Grove Farmers’ Market at the Local Harvest Grocery booth Stop by the booth for a quick class and instruction on saving seeds from your garden. Becca will also have the Seed Library on site so folks can bring their seeds for donation or take seeds for their gardens.

Let it Ferment! A class in beverage fermentation Presented by Jenny Bangert of Bamboo Studios and Maddie Earnest of Local Harvest August 26, 2014 6-8p.m., $20.00 Location: LHC, 3137 Morgan Ford Road, 63116 Ready to try your hand at making your own Kombucha or Kefir? Jenny and Maddie will give you the know how as well as the benefits to eating and drinking fermented beverages and foods.  (BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND)

You can “Can It”!  A beginner canning class Presented by Annette Beach of Local Harvest September 11,  5-8 p.m., $60.00 Location: LHC Just like grandma used to do…or you wish she did. Come and learn how to preserve the bounty of summer/fall in this beginning class on canning. Annette will cover safety, equipment and participants will leave with some canned jars of their very own.  Participants will get hands on experience.  The course will also provide recipes for holiday gift giving from your very own kitchen.
DIY Kim Chi and Sauerkraut Presented by Jenny Bangert of Bamboo Studios September 18, 2014, 6-7:30, $20.00 Location: LHC, 3137 Morgan Ford Road, 63116 Curious about fermentation? Wondering how you can make it yourself? It’s pretty easy and delicious. Come learn with us. Jenny will let you in on why you should add fermented foods into your diet.  You’ll leave with your own jar of kim chi.

Coconut Oil…What’s the big deal? Presented by Angie Carl of My Coconut Kitchen October 16, 2014, 6-7:30  $10 Location: LHC, 3137 Morgan Ford Road, 63116 Angie Carl of My Coconut Kitchen will present information about coconut oil and your health. She will introduce her products and also do a cooking demonstration using My Coconut Kitchen and coconut oils. There will be lots of sampling and takeaways.  Special pricing on her products for participants

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Summer wine, quick pickle recipe

KNOW YOUR Rosérose
Rosé wine is a type of wine that incorporates some of the color from the grape skins to alter the color, but not enough to qualify as a red wine. The “pink” color can range from a light orange to near purple depending on the variety of grape and technique of the wine maker. Typically the grape skins are in contact with the juice for 1-3 days and then removed. Skin contact is the primary method for producing rosé wine.
Rosé wines can be still, semi-sparkling, sparking and bone-dry to very sweet.
At Local Harvest Grocery:
Libalis Rose $4.99 SUPER SALE Floral, semi-sweet rose from La Rioja
La Closerie des Lys This French Rosé is made from a blend of Sirah, Grenache and Cinsault
Barrel 27 Shenanigans Made from a blend of  Grenache, Syrah and Mourvedre  This very floral rosé has a light strawberry flavor. Some tasters prefer this one served at room temp.
Sean Minor 4 Bears Pairs well with lighter fare such as salads, mushroom dishes, or  sipped on its own.  On the palette it has a nice strawberry note.
KNOW YOUR TOMATOESheirloom
Heirlooms
Heirloom varieties are more and more prevalent at farmer’s markets and also in Local Harvest Grocery. An heirloom tomato is open-pollinated and typically introduced before 1940 or has been in circulation for more than 50 years.  Heirlooms can also be “family” heirlooms meaning that the seeds have been passed through several generations in a family.
Why heirlooms matter?
Buying and growing heirloom varieties is a great way to preserve genetic diversity.  Much of our crop diversity has disappeared in order to have more commercially appealing tomatoes. Heirloom tomatoes often aren’t perfectly shaped, but each heirloom offers its own unique flavor and characteristics.
picklesGARDEN SPOTLIGHT–Pickles!
Are you overflowing with cucumbers or hot peppers? Try our quick pickling recipe for an easy and tasty way to enjoy that bounty.
Yield: 3 pint jars
Prep time: 30-35 minutes
Equipment: 3 clean pint mason jars, non-reactive sauce pan
Ingredients:
pickling cucumbers (5 cucumbers for three jars) or
your choice hot pepper (30-40  for three jars)
2 cups distilled vinegar
1.5 cups water
4 teaspoons kosher salt
6-8 cloves garlic (mashed)
3-4 carrots (for pickled peppers) cut on an angle
4 tablespoons dill seeds (may want to use these only for the cucumbers) or fresh dill flowers
3 teaspoons whole black peppercorn
1. Add garlic, peppercorns, dill seeds (evenly distribute between jars)
2. Wash produce thoroughly.
3. Chop peppers into 1/4 inch rounds or cucumbers into spears that will fit into your jars (leave on peel)
4. If using carrots in the peppers, peel and cut on an angle.
5. Fill jars will the chopped vegetables.  For a spicier pickle, you might consider adding a couple jalapeno or cayenne slices to your cucumbers.
6. Make brine  by combining vinegar, water, and salt in a non-reactive sauce pan or pot. Bring to a boil and stir until all the salt is dissolved.
7. Pour the hot brine over the vegetables to within 1/4″ of the top. Wipe the jar top, put the lids on and tighten.  Age for 2 days in the refrigerator and then enjoy!
8. Use within three weeks.
9. Amaze your friends with your wicked pickling talents.
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